This phrase brought to you by the Bible

 

On my Good Friday meditate-a-thon last week, as I read the Gospel of John, it struck me once again how many well-known phrases and expressions the Bible has given to us.

This first came on my radar several years ago, when a colleague at the public school where I teach was developing a Bible as Literature course.   He was creating a poster to advertise the class, and wanted to highlight common sayings that have their origin in Scripture, sayings that people would know even if they weren’t Jewish or Christian.   I had a blast brainstorming with him.  Alas, I’ve since forgotten most of what I shared, that brain space having been given over to remembering to bring Luke’s backpack to daycare.

But here are some that leap to my mind (and to Scott’s):

*Saying that someone walks on water
*“Am I my brother’s keeper?”
* Calling someone a Good Samaritan
*  The spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak
*The last shall be first, and the first shall be last
*The blind leading the blind
* having the wisdom of Solomon
*reading the writing on the wall

What am I missing?  (I could look it up online, but I’d rather ask you!)

3 responses to “This phrase brought to you by the Bible

  1. * separating the wheat from chaff

  2. Ah, good one, Carrie. One of my FB friends contributed “turn the other cheek” — that one also never occurred to me!

  3. Victoria DeBayle

    *oh ye of little faith
    *as old as Methuselah
    *calling someone a “prodigal son” (or daughter)